Capuchin Franciscan Friars
Province of the Stigmata of St. Francis
BECOMING A CAPUCHIN FRANCISCAN FRIAR

Friar means brother.  To become a Capuchin Franciscan Friar is to answer God's call
to a life of Gospel brotherhood according to the example of St. Francis of Assisi and
the Capuchin tradition.  

After a period of discernment with the Vocation Director, a man may begin the
application process.  This involves completing the application form, an interview with
the Provincial Minister, psychological testing and some other requirements.

After acceptance into the Province, a candidate must complete the following initial
formation program.

Postulancy:  Usually a period of 12 months in which a man lives with the friars
participating in their life of fraternity, prayer and service.  There are classes for them
during the week that help in their spiritual life and their knowledge of the faith and
Capuchin way of life.  The period of time for Postulancy could be extended if a man is
not ready for Novitiate.

Novitiate:  This is accomplished in collaboration with other provinces.  It begins with a
three month period of preparation then formally begins the first week of Advent when a
man receives the habit and title "Brother" and it is expected to begin to live the vowed
life.  It is an intense experience of fraternity and prayer.  There are classes in religious
and Capuchin life with outgoing spiritual direction and supervision.

Temporary Profession of Vows:  At the end of the Novitiate year, believing that God
has called them to be a Capuchin Franciscan Friar and accepted by the Provincial
Minister, a man professes the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience for three years.  
During the first two years of this time of formation, all temporary professed friars live
together.  They participate in the regular life of a Capuchin friar seeking to deepen
their vocation to this way of life.  During the third year of temporary profession, a friar
is assigned to another of our houses to continue to grow in the life.  At the end of his
time in temporary vows which could extend up to six years, but usually does not exceed
four years, a friar perpetually professes his vows for life.